16th Int'l Conference on Project Management and Scheduling
April, 17-20, 2018
Residenza di Ripetta - Via di Ripetta, 231 
Rome - Italy

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INVITED SPEAKERS
Prof.
Jacques Carlier
Prof.
Rolf H. Möhring
Prof.
Erwin Pesch
Université de Technologie de Compiègne
Berlin University of Technology
and
Beijing Institute for Scientific and Engineering Computing
Universität Siegen

Comparing Event-Node Graphs with Nonrenewable Resources and Activity-Node Graphs with Renewable ResourcesOnline Scheduling of Bidirectional TrafficOptimization Problems in Intermodal Transport
At the end of the fifties, two main approaches were proposed to manage a large project: the PERT method and the MPM method. In both approaches the project is modelled by a graph and one has to compute critical paths. In the PERT graph, an activity is represented by an arc whenever nodes represent events. In the MPM graph, an activity is represented by a node whenever arcs represent precedence constraints. The drawback of both methods is that they do not take into account resources. The specific drawback of the event-node graph is its large size. The scheduling literature is essentially devoted to problems with renewable resources and precedence constraints, modelled by an activity-node graph. Renewable resources are allocated to activities at their starting times and released at their completion times. A machine is an example of a renewable resource. The basic problem is the Resource Constrained Project scheduling Problem (RCPSP). The aim of this talk is to rehabilitate event-node graph and nonrenewable resources. A nonrenewable resource is produced or consumed by an activity at its occurrence time. The money is an example of a nonrenewable resource. Our basic problem is the Extended Resource Constrained Project Scheduling Problem (ERCPSP). We will present a brief review of literature on ERCPSP. We will explain that several approaches built for RCPSP can be adapted to ERCPSP. We will also report some polynomial algorithms. Next we will introduce several lower bounds and some linear programming models inspired from RCPSP ones. Finally we will report some computational results and explain why it is useful to study ERCPSP.
The lecture is based on joint work with Aziz Moukrim and Abderrahim Sahli 
We introduce, discuss, and solve a hard practical optimization problem that deals with routing bidirectional traffic on a line. This situation occurs in train traffic on a single track with sidings, in ship traffic in a canal, or in bidirectional data communication.
We illustrate our methods and algorithms on the Kiel Canal, which is the world’s busiest artificial waterway with more passages than the Panama and Suez Canal together. The  scheduling problem arises from scarce resources (sidings) that are the only locations where large ships can pass each other in opposing directions. This requires decisions on who should wait for whom (scheduling), in which siding to wait (packing) and when and how far to steer a ship between sidings (routing), and all this for online arriving ships at both sides of the canal.
We have developed a combinatorial algorithm that provides a unified view of routing and scheduling. It combines concurrent (global) and sequential (local) solution approaches to allocate scarce network resources to a stream of online arriving vehicles in a collision-free manner. Computational experiments on real traffic data with results obtained by human expert planners show that our algorithm improves upon manual planning by 25%.
This combination of routing and scheduling (without the packing) leads to a new class of scheduling problems, and we will also address recent complexity and approximation results for this class.
The lecture is based on joint work with Elisabeth Lübbecke and Marco Lübbecke.
In intermodal container transportation, where containers need to be transported between customers (shippers or receivers) and container terminals (rail or maritime) and vice versa, transshipment of containers is commonly arranged at the terminals. Attracting a higher share of freight traffic on rail requires freight handling in railway terminals that is more efficient, and which includes technical innovations as well as the development of suitable optimization approaches and decision-support systems. In this talk we will review some optimization problems of container processing in railway yards, and analyze basic decision problems and solution approaches for the two most important yard types: conventional rail-road and modern rail-rail transshipment yards. Furthermore, we review some of the relevant literature and identify open research challenges.
Additionally we address a container dispatching and conflict-free gantry crane routing problem that arises at a storage container block in an automated, maritime container terminal. A container block serves as an intermediate buffer for inbound and outbound containers and exchanges of containers between water- and landside of a maritime terminal. The considered block is perpendicular to the waterside and employs two rail mounted gantry cranes. Cranes may have the same or different sizes and therefore either are based at the opposite sides of the container block or can cross each other. The question arises in which order and by which crane containers are transported in order to minimize the makespan and prevent crane conflicts.


Prof.
Jacques Carlier
Jacques Carlier was born in Paris, France on 1949 September 25. He receives the degrees of Computer Science in 1972 and Mathematics in 1974, MSc (DEA) in Operations Research in 1973, PhD (Doctorat de troisième cycle) on Disjunctive Scheduling Problems in 1975 and PhD (Doctorat d’état) on Resource Constrained Project Scheduling in 1984, all from University of Paris VI. From 1974 to 1985, he was assistant-Professor at the same University. Since 1985 he is Professor at Compiègne University of Technology, emeritus since 2015. He was teaching Operations Research, Mathematics and Computer Science. His research interests concern Combinatorial Optimization and in particular scheduling problems, telecommunication networks and network reliability. During his carrier, he was the supervisor of more than 30 PhD students. His works on scheduling are well known. They include methods for the one machine sequencing problem, the m-machine scheduling problem, the job-shop, the RCPSP and the financing problem. He is member of the editorial board of EJOR and RAIRO and has published 60 papers in international journals.
Prof.
Rolf H. Möhring
Rolf H. Möhring received the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in mathematics with the RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany, in 1973 and 1975, respectively. Since 1987, he has been a Professor for Applied Mathematics and Computer Science with the Berlin University of Technology, Berlin, Germany, where he has founded and led the research group Combinatorial Optimization and Graph Algorithms. He has held earlier positions as an Associate and an Assistant Professor with the University of Bonn, the University of Hildesheim, and the RWTH Aachen University. Since 2016, he has been a Professor Emeritus with TU Berlin, Berlin, and since 2014, he has been a Honorary Professor with the Beijing University of Technology, Beijing, China, where he serves in the Board of Directors of the Beijing Institute for Scientific and Engineering Computing (BISEC). Part of his research has been done in DFG Research Center Matheon, Berlin, where he was a Scientist in charge of Application Area logistics, traffic, and telecommunication networks. His current research interests include graph algorithms, combinatorial optimization, scheduling, logistics, and industrial applications. Dr. Möhring was a recipient of the Scientific Award of the German Operations Research Society and the EURO Gold Medal of the European Association of Operational Research Societies. He has been the Chair of the German Operations Research Society and the Mathematical Programming Society.
Prof.
Erwin Pesch
Erwin Pesch studied Mathematics and Computer Science at the Technical University Darmstadt. He worked at the Commerzbank AG and later as assistant professor at the University in Maastricht (Netherlands) and as professor in the Institute of Economics of the University in Bonn. Currently, he is a full professor at the Faculty of Economics and Business Administration of the University in Siegen and director of the Center for Advanced Studies in Management at the HHL Leipzig Graduate School of Management. He holds a Ph.D. in Mathematics and a Habilitation in Business Administration. His research areas are mainly in Logistics, Scheduling and  Project Management, and Personnel Planning many of which are closely related to different industrial projects. He received a number of distinctions, e.g., the Copernicus Prize (together with J. Blazewicz) jointly awarded by the national science foundations DFG and FNP. He is author or co-author of 6 books about 200 papers in many international journals. He is area or associate editor of 13 scientific journals, has frequently been a keynote or plenary speaker at international conferences, and was responsible for the organization of the ECCO 2001 and the EURO 2009 conference in Bonn that attracted 2500 delegates.